Wednesday, March 18, 2020

BMW group essays

BMW group essays Bayerische Motoren Werke, more known as BMW was founded in 1916 in Germany. The company specialized in making automobiles, motorcycles and software. The first mentioned was to become their main funding source, accounting for nearly 75 per cent of the companys sales. They were to become one of the top automobile makers in Europe. BMWs road to success has not been an easy one! During World War One the company was established to manufacture engines; in 1945 they were still leading manufacturer of aero-engines in Germany. When World War Two came to an end, the aero-engine market and BMWs capital equipment was under serious threat. Since Germany lost the war, the demand for aero-engines was temporarily non-existent. Even if there would be a demand, they would not get a part of it since BMWs main factory was now in the Soviet occupation zone. Trying to survive, BMW concentrated on automobile production, but without a focus, offering a wide range of cars. They produced everything from small bubble cars to limousines but failed to meet the markets demand. Facing bankruptcy in 1959, BMW found a powerful shareholder, Herbert Quandt. He would help the company to get things right again and only a couple years later they launched BMW 1500. This car helped BMW automobile brand to establish a reputation for engineering excellence. Today it is hard to single out a specific factor that contributed to the success that have made BMW one of the most profitable automobile manufacturers in the world. Therefore we will take a closer look into those factors in our description and analysis of BMW automobiles. The problem statement in this case and also considered as a future problem for the BMW group: How will they manage to retain their top position in the automobile industry on their own, without being forced to become a part of a merger or get acquisitioned? ...

Monday, March 2, 2020

The History and Purpose of the U.S. Federal Reserve

The History and Purpose of the U.S. Federal Reserve The Federal Reserve System, created with the enactment of the Federal Reserve Act on December 23, 1913, is the central banking system of the United States. Popularly known as the Federal Reserve or simply the Fed, the Federal Reserve System was created in the belief that centralized, regulated control of the nation’s monetary system would help alleviate or prevent financial crises like the Panic of 1907. In creating the Fed, Congress sought to maximize employment, stabilize the prices of goods and services, and moderate the long-term effects of changes in the interest rate. Since it was first created, events like the Great Depression in the 1930s and the Great Recession during the 2000s have resulted in the modification and expansion of the Federal Reserve System’s roles, responsibilities, and authorities.   Banking in the United States before the creation of the Federal Reserve System was, to say the least, chaotic. Early American Banking: 1791-1863 Banking in the America of 1863 was far from easy or dependable. The First Bank (1791-1811) and Second Bank (1816-1836) of the United States were the only official representatives of the U.S. Treasury Department - the only sources that issued and backed official U.S. money. All other banks were operated under state charter, or by private parties. Each bank issued its own individual, banknotes. All of the state and private banks competed with each other and the two U.S. Banks to make sure that their notes were redeemable for full face value. As you traveled around the country, you never knew exactly what kind of money you would get from the local banks. With Americas population growing in size, mobility, and economic activity, this multiplicity of banks and kinds of money soon grew chaotic and  unmanageable. The National Banks: 1863-1913 In 1863, the U.S. Congress passed the first National Bank Act providing for a supervised system of National Banks. The Act set up operational standards for the banks, established minimum amounts of capital to be held by the banks, and defined how the banks were to make and administer loans. In addition, the Act imposed a 10% tax on state banknotes, thus effectively eliminating non-federal currency from circulation. What is a National Bank? Any bank using the phrase, National Bank in its name must be a member of the Federal Reserve System. They must maintain minimum levels of reserves with one of the 12 Federal Reserve banks and must deposit a percentage of their customers savings account and checking account deposits in a Federal Reserve bank. All banks incorporated under a national charter are required to become members of the Federal Reserve System. Banks incorporated under a state charter may also apply for Federal Reserve membership. The Federal Reserve System: 1913 to DateFunctions of the Federal Reserve System By 1913, Americas economic growth both at home and abroad required a more flexible, yet better controlled and safer banking system. The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 established the Federal Reserve System as the central banking authority of the United States. Under the Federal Reserve Act of 1913 and amendments over the years, the Federal Reserve System: Conducts Americas monetary policySupervises and regulates banks and protects consumers credit rightsMaintains the stability of Americas financial systemProvides financial services to the U.S. federal government, the public, financial institutions, and foreign financial institutions The Federal Reserve makes loans to commercial banks and is authorized to issue the Federal Reserve notes that comprise Americas entire supply of paper money. Organization of the Federal Reserve SystemBoard of Governors Overseeing the system, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, controls operations of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks, several monetary and consumer advisory committees and the thousands of member banks across the United States.The Board of Governors sets minimum reserve limits (how much capital banks must have on hand) for all member banks, sets the discount rate for the 12 Federal Reserve Banks, and reviews the budgets of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks.

Friday, February 14, 2020

Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) Essay

Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) - Essay Example This, therefore, has resulted to an open innovation concept where organizations discover that all the components of innovation do not have to originate from within the institution. However, they can increase or accelerate their efforts by obtaining the required technology from external sources. Sources, that is of the same minds with them but use a different method in producing their goods and services. Henry in his book, ‘The New Imperative for Creating and Profiting from Technology’, describes external innovation as the â€Å"act of allowing external information derived from sources such as cooperation with universities or (corporate) venture capital efforts to be part of a company’s innovation process and permeating the company`s boundaries from outside to inside† (Henry, 2006). The concept of outdoor innovation is one of many pathways shaped in the company. This is to allow new product thoughts to tour inside and outside the firm’s borders and to be bundled with exterior skills and knowledge. One of the organizations that have undergone enormous innovation due to the external thoughts is the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). California Institute for Regenerative Medicine is an organization that improved the development of therapies and potential cures based on the stem cell science (Michael & Panetta, 2005). In November 2004, voters provided three billion dollars for the stem research. California has a massive biotech industry that spreads around San Diego and San Francisco, this pool of funds is used for innovation. The funds also helped in enhancing research and creating job at the university level and in confidential sectors. The California Institute for Regenerating Medicine created an oversight that determined how and where grants were to be made and the organization. The California institute for regenerating medicine also defined on the allocation of funds in order to meet the set mission. The org anization had to focus on innovations both internal and external by carrying out research on product development and clinical trials. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine later specially made an external evaluation of its strategy procedures and policies that they afterward implemented. The main purpose of employing an external review was to come up with ways of evaluating CIRM`s precedent performance. The review also provided a recommendation on what to be put in place for long term success. CIRM conducted a public meeting on different days with Governing Board`s heads and those who took part in the Review. This helped them to understand fully what CIRM entails, and what is needed for CIRM to achieve its goals. Towards the end of the year 2006, the CIRM published the first magazine to define its scientific strategic plan. This plan served as an outline for the procedures and programs implementations. This plan has helped the institute in its progress thus, being able to register a remarkable progress in the subsequent years. The institute has progressed much in areas of management or leadership, industry appointments, product growth and group prioritization. The institute achieves this while it continues to look after the people and science that will drive them forward CIRM’s first objective has been to support research at the uppermost level of scientific merit. These objectives have been achieved and in return, significantly improved

Saturday, February 1, 2020

Vietnam war Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Vietnam war - Research Paper Example Critical analysis of The Things They Carried, by Tim OBrien offers a first-hand experience narration by a participant in the war. It is therefore imperative that in-depth assessment of the text is undertaken to draw the comparative analysis of what transpired in the Siege of Khe Sanh-that ran from mid-January 1968 through June 1968. Several questions were left unanswered in regard to the number of military officers United States lost before they were compelled to give up in the war amidst public discontent in funding it (Rottman 71-3). In this regard, further investigative research is important in making informed conclusions and deriving findings. Assessment of the events that constitute the Siege of Khe Sanh forms the basis of making informed conclusion on the actual magnitude of United States’ lost bid to impose capitalism in Vietnam. Further brainstorming entails exploration of the information gap through review of past literature on the topic. A formal research proposal will unravel facts and figures to guide in boosting the public understanding of costs incurred by United States in the Vietnam War with particular focus on its logistics and strategic planning base of Khe

Vietnam war Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Vietnam war - Research Paper Example Critical analysis of The Things They Carried, by Tim OBrien offers a first-hand experience narration by a participant in the war. It is therefore imperative that in-depth assessment of the text is undertaken to draw the comparative analysis of what transpired in the Siege of Khe Sanh-that ran from mid-January 1968 through June 1968. Several questions were left unanswered in regard to the number of military officers United States lost before they were compelled to give up in the war amidst public discontent in funding it (Rottman 71-3). In this regard, further investigative research is important in making informed conclusions and deriving findings. Assessment of the events that constitute the Siege of Khe Sanh forms the basis of making informed conclusion on the actual magnitude of United States’ lost bid to impose capitalism in Vietnam. Further brainstorming entails exploration of the information gap through review of past literature on the topic. A formal research proposal will unravel facts and figures to guide in boosting the public understanding of costs incurred by United States in the Vietnam War with particular focus on its logistics and strategic planning base of Khe

Vietnam war Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Vietnam war - Research Paper Example Critical analysis of The Things They Carried, by Tim OBrien offers a first-hand experience narration by a participant in the war. It is therefore imperative that in-depth assessment of the text is undertaken to draw the comparative analysis of what transpired in the Siege of Khe Sanh-that ran from mid-January 1968 through June 1968. Several questions were left unanswered in regard to the number of military officers United States lost before they were compelled to give up in the war amidst public discontent in funding it (Rottman 71-3). In this regard, further investigative research is important in making informed conclusions and deriving findings. Assessment of the events that constitute the Siege of Khe Sanh forms the basis of making informed conclusion on the actual magnitude of United States’ lost bid to impose capitalism in Vietnam. Further brainstorming entails exploration of the information gap through review of past literature on the topic. A formal research proposal will unravel facts and figures to guide in boosting the public understanding of costs incurred by United States in the Vietnam War with particular focus on its logistics and strategic planning base of Khe

Friday, January 24, 2020

Essay on Adams Curse - Everyones Fate, Everyones Tragedy

Adam's Curse - Everyone's Fate, Everyone's Tragedy  Ã‚  Ã‚   The allusion to the biblical story of Adam and Eve in William Butler Yeats' poem, "Adam's Curse," reflects the poem's pessimistic theme: the tragic nature of fate. In the story, Adam and Eve, the first man and woman, had defied God, and consequently, were thrown out of paradise. Their punishment (and as their descendents, everyone's punishment and "fate") was to feel the joys and the pains of being human, including love and happiness but work and disappointment as well. Yeats parallels this tragedy of Adam and Eve's newly-found mortality with a narrative which is composed mostly of a conversation about the hardships of writing poetry, being beautiful, and staying in love. By linking the two stories, he implies that such endeavors are not only laborious aspects of life, but can be "destined" to end or fail also. Yeats further establishes the inevitability of something ending by setting the conversation "at one summer's end" (1) and later having the speakers see "the last embers of day light die" (29) when the conversation itself dies. Before the conversation dies, however, Yeats' persona begins the talk with the subject of poetry. What is interesting is that they are not composing lines together, but are discussing the end results of poems' lines. According to the persona, the process of creating poetry, including the hours spent in writing and rewriting the lines, or as Yeats states it, "stitching and unstitching" (6), ultimately will be insignificant if the lines are unsuccessful. Although he regards the act of writing poetry as more difficult than physical labor, he would rather "scrub a kitchen pavement" (8) or do other labor-intensive, yet demeaning jobs, than cr... ...s despair in accepting that his and his lover's fate was to grow "As weary-hearted as that hollow moon" (38). The fact that this line, and not a happy, upbeat ending, closes the poem further emphasizes the tragedy. Yeats' somber turn towards the end of the poem is also indicative of what makes fate sometimes tragic: its unpredictability. Similar to the way Adam was unaware of the consequences of eating the forbidden apple, a poet does not know how good, or bad, a poem will be until it is finished. Similar to the fleeting notion of beauty, love can easily fade. The fact that all these endeavors could be rewarding makes the sudden loss an unbearable, and therefore, "tragic" fate.   Work Cited Yeats, William Butler. "Adam's Curse." Western Wind. 4th ed. Ed. John Frederick Nims and David Mason. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2000. 431-32.